Posts in Colloquial
concierge parent

The concierge parent differs from the helicopter parent in that, while the helicopter parent is hovering overhead to protect the child from any danger, the concierge parent is there to solve all of life’s problems for the child.

ZG: 5

Discussions of parenting styles can be relied on to surface in the media from time to time. This one may seem a niche term but it will probably pop up again.

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textile beach

This is an amusing term used by those who favour nude beaches for a beach where people wear swimming costumes. You can also refer to a person who wears a swimming costume as a textile.

ZG: 5

It’s fun and colloquial but the jargon of a small group.

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bougie

This is a bit of American slang that we have taken a while to adopt. It dates back to the 1960s in the US where it seems particularly popular with speakers of Black American English.

ZG: 6

Despite the problems with its pronunciation, this is a slang term that has a cheerful appeal.

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bin chicken

There is a breed of humans who have taken on the bin chicken’s name. These are people who raid garbage bins for recyclable cans and bottles.

ZG: 9

I love the way that humans gave these birds this half-derogatory, half-affectionate name, and now it is being turned back onto the humans.

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L-plate

L-plate leader, L-plate politician. These epithets have become a very Australian way of deriding our politicians.

ZG: 6

High marks for Australian connotations but low marks as just another bit of sloganeering emerging from Canberra.

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moonshot

I foresee that this word is going to cause a heap of trouble in the future because there are two moonshots with two different etymologies which have already become confused.

ZG: 5

This seems to be a buzzword of the moment in certain circles, but possibly not one with wide currency.

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ColloquialSue ButlerComment
whack-a-mole

It is perfectly possible that play whack-a-mole will take off but at the moment it has low frequency in Australian English. And indeed, it has popped up again (30 July 2018) with Malcolm Turnbull saying ‘the government has to treat Labor’s lies like “whack-a-mole”.’

ZG: 2

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